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Assistant Professor Simos Gerasimidis of the Civil and Environmental Engineering Department is a highly accomplished professional engineer who has worked on such larger-than-life structures as the new Yankee Stadium, the Olympic Stadium and Velodrome for the Athens Olympics of 2004, and major interventions associated with the largest Byzantine monuments in Thessaloniki, Greece – the Rotunda and the Eptapyrgion. This is the kind of rich experience that Gerasimidis brings to UMass.

A study done by the UMass Amherst Traffic Safety Research Program (UMassSafe) and completed in June of 2016 finds that seatbelt use is at an all-time high in Massachusetts, but the state still lags behind others in seatbelt use. The study finds that 78.2 percent of drivers and front-seat passengers use seatbelts, up from 67 percent as recently as 2006. Last year the figure was 74 percent. The national average is 88.5 percent. Robin Riessman, associate director of the UMassSafe Program, says seatbelt use has been increasing during the past 10 years, and especially during the last year studied.

The First Academy of Distinguished Alumni Inaugural Banquet was held this past Friday, September 23rd at the Marriott Center, Campus Center 11th​ floor. These awards recognize the outstanding contribution of the inductees to the Engineering profession, as judged by the Civil and Environmental Engineering Advisory Council and reviewed by current Civil and Environmental Engineering Faculty. There were 14 recipients: 

UMass PhD student Nicholas Fournier won the Institute of Transportation Engineers (ITE) Daniel B. Fambro Student Paper Award for his paper titled: “A Seasonal Bicycle Demand Model Using A Sinusoidal Function." Nicholas received the award during the ITE International Annual Meeting and Exhibit that was held August 14-17, 2016 in Anaheim, CA.

Dr. Ernest T. Selig

1933-2016

Dr. Ernest T. Selig, "Ernie", was born in Harrisburg, PA to Ernest T. Selig, Jr. and Dorothy Ferree Selig, the second of three children. Ernie, with his sister Jean and younger brother Larry, grew up attending 8 different schools in PA, MO, CO, UT, OH and DE before college. Graduating first in his high school class, he enrolled at Cornell University in mechanical engineering.

Boris Lau of the Civil and Environmental Engineering Department was one of 10 campus academics who each received a $1,000 Sustainability Curriculum Fellowship (SCF), a year-long interdisciplinary program sponsored by the Chancellor’s Office and others to develop or augment courses with sustainability-related topics. As Lau explains about how he will use the fellowship, “My overarching goal is to enable students to understand the important roles of nanoscale science and technology in achieving water sustainability.” See News Office article

On Friday, September 30, the College of Engineering at the University of Massachusetts Amherst will hold its seventh annual Outstanding Alumni Awards Celebration during Homecoming Weekend. The college’s celebration will include be held in the Marriott Room on the 11th floor of the Campus Center at UMass Amherst. The Homecoming Reception & Awards Celebration will begin at 4:30 p.m. During the reception, the College of Engineering will present its Outstanding Senior and Junior Alumni Awards to eight individuals who, through exemplary accomplishments, epitomize the potential of an education at the UMass Amherst College of Engineering.

Richard N. Palmer, the head of the Civil and Environmental Engineering Department, commented in a story on August 26 by the Boston Globe about illegal lawn watering in the suburbs of Boston during the current drought. As the Globe story explained “Some water under cover of darkness, waiting until night’s protective curtain has fallen to turn on their sprinklers while the neighbors slumber. Some are wealthy enough that, even when busted, they simply pay repeated fines and continue watering their lawn. And still others resort to deception, putting up bogus ‘well water’ signs so they can blast their sprinklers without drawing nasty scowls from neighbors and tickets from local officials.”

Professor David Reckhow of the Civil and Environmental Engineering Department recently told the Wall Street Journal that officials and scientists are reconsidering the use of chloramine, a combination of chlorine and ammonia, as a disinfectant in drinking water. “We’re questioning the wisdom of using chloramines as much as we do in this country,” said Reckhow, a national expert on the treatment of drinking water and the head of the UMass Amherst Water Innovation Network for Sustainable Small Systems (WINSSS), funded by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

A group of 54 brilliant undergraduate researchers, working on cutting-edge summer projects, will present a joint poster session of their Research Experience for Undergraduates on Friday, August 5, from 10:00 a.m. until noon in the Campus Center Auditorium at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. The four REU programs that will participate in the poster session are all funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF).

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