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Effect of different solutes, natural organic matter, and particulate Fe (III) on ferrate (VI) decomposition in aqueous solutions

TitleEffect of different solutes, natural organic matter, and particulate Fe (III) on ferrate (VI) decomposition in aqueous solutions
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2015
AuthorsJiang Y, Goodwill JE, Tobiason JE, Reckhow DA
JournalEnvironmental Science & Technology
Volume49
Issue5
Start Page2841
Pagination2841-2848
Date Published01/2015
Abstract

This study investigated the impacts of buffer ions, natural organic matter (NOM), and particulate Fe(III) on ferrate(VI) decomposition and characterized Fe(VI) decomposition kinetics and exposure in various waters. Homogeneous and heterogeneous Fe(VI) decomposition can be described as a second- and first-order reaction with respect to Fe(VI), respectively. Fe(VI) decay was catalyzed by Fe(VI) decomposition products. Solutes capable of forming complexes with iron hydroxides retarded Fe(VI) decay. Fractionation of the resulting solutions from Fe(VI) self-decay and ferric chloride addition in borate- and phosphate-buffered waters showed that phosphate could sequester Fe(III). The nature of the iron precipitate from Fe(VI) decomposition was different from that of freshly precipitated ferric hydroxide from ferric chloride solutions. The stabilizing effects of different solutes on Fe(VI) are in the following order: phosphate > bicarbonate > borate. The constituents of colored and alkaline waters (NOM and bicarbonate) inhibited the catalytic effects of Fe(VI) decomposition products and stabilized Fe(VI) in natural waters. Because of the stabilizing effects of solutes, moderate doses of Fe(VI) added to natural waters at pH 7.5 resulted in exposures that have been shown to be effective for inactivation of target pathogens. Preformed ferric hydroxide was less effective than freshly dosed ferric chloride in accelerating Fe(VI) decomposition.

DOI10.1021/es505516w